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Late model autos populate weekly free food lines

By JOSH RESNEK

An article this weekend in the New York Times noted that many Americans observing free food lines as they are waved past them by police have noticed many families showing up at the free food center arriving in late model automobiles, including Mercedes, BMW, Volvo, and high cost SUVs of every kind.

This brings to the forefront many comments I have heard from Everett residents who understand the vast majority of residents lining up in their late model automobiles are finding it hard to feed their families without the food giveaways.

What’s up with that, many have been moved to wonder?

The late, great American folk philosopher and humorist Will Rogers, whose comments on the Depression years remain relevant today put it this way: “We hold the distinction of being the only nation that is goin’ to the poorhouse in an automobile.”

During the weekly free food line-up in front of the Connolly Center on Chelsea Street, dozens of shiny and brightly colored late model automobiles in near to perfect condition formed a long queue waiting for their baskets of free food.

Last week, I noted several Mercedes, and BMW’s, a Cadillac, a Lincoln, new Mazda’s and Nissan’s, Honda’s and Toyota’s.

Like Will Rogers, I scratched my head and wondered how so many people driving so many newer expensive automobiles could afford them but needed to be a line for free food?

The question answers itself.

Most working Americans from every class level need their automobiles almost as much as they need food!

How can people have such automobiles and make payments for them and still have enough spare cash for food?

Answer – that is a hard trick to master.

This explains why during this pandemic, with so many out of work and unemployed, putting gasoline in the tank of your automobile is as important as food.

How else can those who need free food get into a line without an automobile?

The free food lines on Church Street every week have the look and feel of needy people lining up without automobiles to receive their bags of food.

There are a great many hard working people in this city who would never wait in a free food line who express disbelief that so many who own such newer automobiles should get rid of them until they can feed their families without having to line-up for free food.

As the New York Times wrote: “If only the situation were that simple. But it isn’t.”

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