Easter 2021

MARCH 19: Immaculate Conception church on Broadway. (Photo by Jim Mahoney)


This Easter, more than any in modern world history, reflects the symbolic resurrection of the world coming out of the pandemic now.

The resurrection was preceded by 52 Black Fridays during March 2020 – March 2021.

The uplifting of the spirit that comes with Easter, following the low points of so many Black Fridays, cannot be overestimated this year.

The traditional belief is that Jesus was resurrected from the dead as the Son of God to grant Christians entrance into the kingdom of Heaven.

During these revisionist days when so many people have left religion for materialistic comforts, the resurrection of Jesus as a fact is left to scientific and ecclesiastical discussion among millions of believers.

You do not have to be Christian to celebrate Easter, to gain knowledge of the symbolic power of the Kingdom Jesus left to all of us, should we care to take it on as our own belief system.

This is to say; science is often called the study of dead religions. Religions, so many believe, are exclusively the work and creation of man.

However, eternal life, which Jesus gave to mankind, is proven by the fact that more than 2,000 years after he was crucified on the hill called Golgotha, his name is revered.

He lives on after being crucified.

That he died for mankind is another giant bit of speculation, unless you stop for a moment to contemplate that that is exactly what he did when he was crucified with two others by the Roman procurator of Jerusalem, Pontius Pilate.

Jesus lives eternally among millions and millions of human beings in their minds and their souls who look to God for guidance.

Jesus isn’t entirely about scientific enigma. He is about faith.

A belief in him is a belief in faith.

Disbelievers like to say the dead don’t rise, that Nature indulges in no such fantasies.

The resurrection of Jesus and mankind’s celebration of this seminal moment in the history of mankind gives symbolism to his message during his life and during his pain and suffering on the cross.

“It was not merely a moral and a social revolution that Jesus proclaimed; it is clear from a score of indications that his teaching had a political bent of the plainest sort.

“It is true he said his kingdom was not of this world, that it was in the hearts of men and not upon a thrown; but it is equally clear that whatever and wherever and in what measure his kingdom was set up in the hearts of men, the outer world would be in that measure revolutionized and made new.”

That’s how HG Wells wrote about Jesus in his History of the World, in the chapter titled, The Beginnings of Christianity. Here is how Wells described the events after Jesus’ crucifixion:

“The souls of the disciples were plunged for a time into utter darkness. Then presently came a whisper among them and stories, rather discrepant stories, that the body of Jesus was not in the tomb in which it had been placed, and that first one and then another had seen him alive. Soon they were consoling themselves with the conviction that he had risen from the dead, that he had shown himself to many, and had ascended visibly into heaven. Witnesses were found to declare they had positively seen him go up, visibly in his body. He had gone through the blue-to God. Soon they had convinced themselves that he would presently come again, in power and glory, to judge all mankind. In a little while, they said, he would come back to them; and in these bright revivals of their old-time dream of an assertive and temporal splendor they forgot the greater measure, the giant measure, he had given them the of the Kingdom of God.”

To all our Christian friends we wish a very happy Easter – and a year of health, wealth, happiness, and resurrection as we have not known it for quite some time.


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