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Offering Alternate Relief, Boston Reiki Clinic Open To Public

By Lorenzo Recupero

Contreras offering a patient Reiki therapy at Boston Reiki Clinic on Wolcott Street.

By the time we are adults, whether it be to tend to a muscle ache or otherwise, most of us have experienced a professional massage.

It works the inner linings of our achy muscles, following the natural flow of each strand, easing them back closer to normal with each stroke from the therapist.

Massage therapy pinpoints a troubled location in our bodies to help improve our overall relaxation, blood flow, and energy while easing a physical pain.

Now what if, for those aching in other ways, beyond a back spasm or creaky joint, there was a way to massage our essence, or life force, as a means to feel better by natural healing power, would you try it?

For those that answered yes or at least felt the query piqued some Interest, Boston Reiki Clinic is at your service.

The first of its kind Reiki therapy clinic in our area, owned and run by certified Reiki practitioner and Everett resident Sandra Contreras, is open to cater to those in need of a different kind of “cleansing”.

“The purpose of Reiki is to work with our own energy and the unhealthy blockages in our body,” said Contreras, who officially opened Boston Reiki Clinic at 27 Wolcott Street earlier this month.

So what is Reiki?

Reiki is a Japanese form of energy rejuvenation, a type of alternative medicine for those looking for relief outside the pill bottle. Reiki therapist, or practitioners, use a technique called “palm healing” where the practitioner will hover their hands over the patient’s body to transfer “universal energy” from the palm of the practitioner to the patient in order to promote emotional and physical wellness.

Contreras, certified in Reiki therapy since 2012, recently left her job in the medical field to pursue a full-time career in healing others through Reiki therapy.

Contreras is devout to offering the Reiki therapy services, following a traumatizing experience in 2009, when she was randomly attacked by a man in the women’s restroom at Mass General Hospital where she worked at the time. The ordeal was chronicled in both the Boston Globe and Boston Herald. The physical trauma from the attack left her bruised, but the mental and emotional damage left her battered. Looking for a means to ease her pain, Contreras went to doctors that only offered her medications when the bruises and bumps of the attack had already healed. She learned then the relief she sought wouldn’t be found in modern medicine.

The struggle to find inner peace again led her to studies on our personal chakras, as it’s called in the Indian culture, which are seven main points in our bodies that emit or take in our most vital life forces. Learning more about chakras and how energy flows through us led Contreras to practicing Reiki on herself.

“It’s been a spiritual journey for me and I want to help bring that back into people’s lives that may have experienced trauma similar to mine,” said Contreras, who is offering more of spiritual treatment as opposed to a physical one.

In order to properly offer anyone this therapy “you have to be right within yourself first,” said Contreras, who gave up her medications for Reiki therapy. “I have to give it to myself to be able to offer it to anyone else,” she said.

Prospective patients are urged to come with an open mind and be willing to try something new.

“They may not know what could be possible [through Reiki therapy], but an open mindset and the treatments will help open their eyes. I have respect for all those who decide to take this alternative path, and I’m willing to walk with them,” she said.

“The therapy helped take me out of a dark place and I want to help others do the same,” said Contreras, who recalled working with two patients having trouble with giving birth. The patient couple could not conceive, even after medications prescribed by their doctor to help. After several sessions of Reiki therapy with Contreras, the couple birthed their first child.

“We were able to help bring enjoyment back into the patients lives, helping to drop the meds, which they did not think would be possible. Sure enough, they eventually were able to conceive,” she said.

Through Boston Reiki Clinics services, Contreras is hoping to help attack youth depression and become an alternate source of healing for the City of Everett and the region. She ultimately hopes to be a therapy service option offered at area schools, clinics, and hospitals.

“I employ love and light in my practice. It is pure and authentic to me. There’s no crystals, no hocus pocus, just energy,” said Contreras. “People laugh, cry, sleep during the therapy session, it’s different for everyone depending on what they are going through. A massage is superficial, this therapy is deeper,” she said.

At her Wolcott Street location, Contreras will offer both 1-hour and 30-minute sessions at a rate of $75.99 and $55.99.

To schedule a therapy session at Boston Reiki Clinic, patients can book online at Orbs.godaddysites.com or call (617) 461-4743.

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