Local youth remember George Floyd, others during peaceful vigil

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An emotional, yet peaceful vigil Sunday honored many people who have died during conflicts with police including George Floyd. (Photo by Jim Mahoney)

BY JIM MAHONEY & JOSH RESNEK

A small but stirring memorial for George Floyd, the unarmed black man killed by a white police officer in Minneapolis almost two weeks ago, was organized by younger people in the city’s Black community and held at Glendale Park Sunday from 6-8 p.m..

Protests against racism have riveted the nation since Floyd was killed and his killers jailed.

The protests have been worldwide, highlighting the scourge of racism and what it does to our society as well as to those who are the recipients of it.

A wide range of passionate, youthful speakers delivered eulogies for Floyd as well as speaking out about racial justice.

Crowd estimates ranged from 150-200, according to local police.

The crowd was largely black and Hispanic.

Everyone was wearing facemasks and socially distancing.

It was a racially mixed event with many young white people attending as well.

The speakers decried police brutality and racism.

Last week, the city government held a Zoom vigil for Floyd, with several public officials and a few religious leaders expressing their sentiments.

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Memorial Day ceremony special

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American flags fly in the breeze at Woodlawn Cemetery commemorating Memorial Day. (Photos by Jim Mahoney)

“Under the circumstances, it was awesome.” – Councilor Wayne Matewsky


By JOSH RESNEK

Memorial Day in the age of Coronavirus was bit different this year.

Large crowds planting flags and listening to orations did not occur over the weekend.

What happened here Monday, however, showed the resiliency of the local community in its yearly affirmation of honoring those who gave their lives in the service of this nation.

“The respect that was shown under such dire conditions was amazing,” said Councilor Wayne Matewsky, who attended the event at Woodlawn Cemetery.

“So much respect was shown. I cannot recall a more fitting Memorial Day tribute than what was put on by the city at Woodlawn Cemetery. It was unreal,” he added.

A procession of 75 automobiles led by Everett Police began at Everett High School and wound its way to the cemetery.

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Community partners help in aiding residents amid Coronavirus Pandemic

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Everett City Councilor Stephanie Martins (left) volunteers in the community-wide effort to extend aid to residents during the coronavirus outbreak. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso)

By Lorenzo Recupero

When access to food and other necessities is thwarted by circumstance and emergency, it’s community and nonprofit organizations that come through in toughest times.

In response to Coronavirus, grocery stores across the state have started to take preventative measures for shopping, implementing changes that include, altered opening and closing hours, purchase limits on various items, and special times for seniors only to shop.

The mad dash to supermarkets caused by widespread panic over emergency measures mandated by the state has left shelves bare and families unable to provide for their homes.

Everett based organizations and businesses, including but not limited to, The Grace Food Pantry, The Elliot Family Resource Center, and Encore Boston Harbor have helped alleviate the burden for thousands in the city in recent days.

Donations to the Everett public from local organizations has ranged from thousands of pounds of fresh fruits & veggies, fresh and nonperishable meals, to toys and hygiene products, such as hand sanitizers, diapers and laundry soap.

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— Eye on Everett —

Better or worse?

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By Josh Resnek

Many Everett folks from all walks of life who have lived in the city for the past decade or longer, have very firm ideas about the condition of the city.

Many say the city is worse off than it was ten years ago.

They complain it is more crowded, more difficult to park and drive around, and more dangerous.

Many more say it was better in the old days, when life was more predictable than it is today, when everyone’s memory point to the entire population paying attention to the law and following rules and regulations and watching out for each other.

Many say Everett is better than it was ten years ago – and they point to all the new real estate development and improvements that have been made. All the parks have been redone. New schools have been built. Road and drainage problems have nearly been erased. The city is clean and orderly.

Each successive generation of people living here and across the nation believe their generation was better than the one that came before.

It is known for a fact all generations are essentially the same – a bit like the tide coming in and the tide going out, the seas rising and the seas falling, the tides and the seas are eternal.

During the past ten years the school population has exploded and is continuing to expand.

The new schools are overcrowded. The teaching institution is taxed to the point of breaking. The school population is diverse, poor, struggling, and most of our public school students cannot read or write with ease and understanding in English or in their native languages.

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