Capone wants new EFD hires to be fire firefighters first

EFD Ladder 1 battling a multi-alarm fire on Bellingham Ave. Saturday. (Photo by Kevin Wiles)

Grills Chief Carli on recruit’s role

By JOSH RESNEK

Councilor Fred Capone questioned Fire Chief Anthony Carli about 20 new firefighter hires against the backdrop of Everett firefighters having fought two major fires during the weekend.

New firefighters haven’t joined day-to-day line forces in Everett for the past five years.

Firefighting suppression resources have been lacking here.

The chief was quick to defend the department, which is now training approximately 20 new firefighters to act as EMTs first and firefighters second, as the city morphs into having its own emergency ambulance service.

A five-alarm fire in Revere on Endicott Avenue brought Everett firefighters to the scene on a nearly all-day call which required mutual aid companies from out of the city to be stationed in firehouses here.

A day following that fire, a fire on Bellingham Avenue emptied Everett’s firehouses again until the fire was suppressed.

Continue reading Capone wants new EFD hires to be fire firefighters first

Fire ravages The Scrubbing Board

Everett firefighters battled the smoky blaze but the business is thought to be a total loss. (Photo courtesy of Stanley Forman)

No injuries reported as damage estimates range close to $700K

By JOSH RESNEK

The Scrubbing Board on Hancock Street, one of this city’s major launderettes, suffered a fire in its ceiling Monday.

The business was destroyed but the owner, John Mattuchio, said it will be rebuilt completely.

Matuccio estimated the loss at $500,000- $750,000.

“I believe the fire started in the ceiling and was confined to the ceiling and roof. The firefighters believe the fire must have started from an electrical malfunction of wiring in the ceiling,” he added.

Mattuchio, a well- known Everett businessman and the former president of the local Kiwanis Club, said he was grateful for the great effort made by the Everett Fire Department to minimize the loss.

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We are on borrowed time

On March 22, the city council was informed by the fire chief that it was going to cost approximately $1.25 million to replace the aging arial Ladder 1, a 1995 Pierce heavy-duty ladder truck.

Aerial 1 is out of service.

The old Ladder 2 truck was sold many months back for $5,000.

This leaves only Aerial ladder 2 in working order. It is housed in the Ferry Street fire station.

Councilor Mike McLaughlin asked the chief to give an overview of the ladder truck situation.

“We are on borrowed time,” the chief replied.

Who is on borrowed time, we all should wonder?

Is it the people of Everett who rely on the rapid response of the fire department who are on borrowed time?

Is it the firefighters who need working equipment when it comes to matters of life and death when a building is on fire? The city has one aerial truck to rely on right now. The second ladder truck is out of service and so is virtually and physically useless.

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Thinking out loud

By STEPHEN PINTO

What does transitioning the Everett Fire Department mean? What is the mayor trying to do with the Fire Department? Why isn’t the Fire Chief resisting the change?
Reduction in staffing instead of hiring as promised? Closing stations?

Not purchasing or upgrading equipment or stations? Slower response time?
What effect if any would it have on mutual aid? Reduction or longer wait times for inspections? Putting lives at risk?

One slow year in fatal fires is great news but it should not automatically result in cutbacks or changes in operation.

If we turn our back on the fire department, there will be fatalities and injuries.

A city with a growing population and housing is not the time to take chances.

Too many Everett homes are built close together, easily allowing a fire to spread.

If we have firehouses responding to multiple injury or illness calls. what happens if a major fire were to then break out in the city? What if a second broke out at the same time? Ambulance calls can easily take up to twenty-thirty minutes while the patient is being assessed.

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